Thursday, December 03, 2009

1st December Questions

This week’s questions were set by the Ox-fford ‘C’.

Thanks to the Plough Horntails and the Sutton Church House for their help in vetting them.

The specialist rounds are:

1.           Arts & Entertainment – Weather With You

2.           Geography

3.           Local Heroes – a different slant

4.           History

5.           World Heritage

6.           Science – In the Kitchen

7.           Sport

8.           What comes next?

As always, our reference source for the vast majority of these questions is Wikipedia: the free encyclopaedia that anyone can edit (but perhaps unwisely, we don’t let that put us off!).

Round One: Arts & Entertainment – Weather With You

Each question includes a reference to the weather, in either the question or the answer.
1.   
Q
Which 1971 film starred Clint Eastwood as a disc jockey stalked by an obsessive fan?

A

Play Misty for me

2.   
Q
Which 1988 film is named after its central character, Raymond Babbitt?

A
Rain Man
3.   
Q
In which book and film is Dorothy Gale the central character?

A
The Wizard of Oz
4.   
Q
Who wrote the novel Gone with the Wind?

A
Margaret Mitchell
5.   
Q
In which TV series do Edina and Saffy Monsoon appear?

A
Absolutely Fabulous
6.   
Q
Which children’s TV series featured the Lightning Tree?

A
Follyfoot
7.   
Q
Which band spent four weeks at Number One in 1969 with Something in the air, their one and only hit?

A
Thunderclap Newman (Pete Townshend produced and played bass – making it his only No. 1!)
8.   
Q
In which band was Kerry Katona replaced in 2001 by Jenny Frost?

A

Atomic Kitten

Supplementaries

9.   
Q
What is Tintin’s dog called in English?

A

Snowy

10.   
Q
Which “alternative rock” band is fronted by Gary Lightbody?

A
Snow Patrol
11.   
Q
Which song includes the line “Thunderbolt and lightning, very very frightening”?

A
Bohemian Rhapsody
12.   
Q
In Shakespeare’s The Tempest, who is the duke of Milan and the father of Miranda?

A
Prospero
13.   
Q
Who wrote the line “Eternal sunshine of the spotless mind” in his poem Eloisa to Abelard?

A
Alexander Pope

Round Two: Geography

1.   
Q
The state capital of Alaska is Juneau, but what’s its largest city?

A
Anchorage (population 360,000 – approx. 11 times that of Juneau, and 40% of the entire state)
2.   
Q
Lake Eyre, 15 metres below sea level, is the lowest point in which country?

A
Australia
3.   
Q
Which world-famous geographical feature is on the Caroní (ka-ro-NEE) River, a tributary of the Orinoco?

A
Angel Falls
4.   
Q
What’s the capital of the Former Yugoslavian Republic of Macedonia?

A
Skopje
5.   
Q
Timişoara (timish-wara) is the second largest city in which European country?

A
Romania
6.   
Q
Which Scottish island has eight whisky distilleries, including one in its “capital” Bowmore?

A
Islay (eye-la)
7.   
Q
Which town near Antwerp, in Belgium, gives its name to a type of cloth, and a type of coat made from it?

A
Duffel
8.   
Q
Popocatépetl (po-po-ca-TE-petl), an active volcano, is the second highest mountain in which country?

A
Mexico

Supplementaries

9.   
Q
What’s the capital of Croatia?

A
Zagreb
10.   
Q
What’s the largest and most northerly of the Inner Hebrides?

A
Skye

Round Three: Local Heroes – a different slant

We’d already set this round, and called it Local Heroes, when we took part in the New Castle’s round of the same name in the last League game.  But it’s completely different …
It’s about the pubs of J. D. Wetherspoon.  Whatever you may think of them, they often provide a great service to local history (and quiz contestants) by being named after local celebrities.  This round is about some of them.  We’ll give you the name of the town and some clues to the celebrity; you have to name the celebrity.
1.   
Q
Oswestry, Shropshire: First World War poet, killed in action one week before the armistice; born there in 1893

A
Wilfred Owen
2.   
Q
Bury, Lancashire: 19th century prime minister, born near the town in 1788

A
Robert Peel
3.   
Q
Bournemouth: writer, daughter of an early feminist and wife of a famous poet, who spent her final days there and was buried there

A
Mary Shelley
4.   
Q
Portsmouth: creator of the Great Western Railway, born there in 1806

A
Isambard Kingdom Brunel
5.   
Q
Swadlincote, Derbyshire: designer of the Mallard and Flying Scotsman, whose family came from the area

A
Sir Nigel Gresley
6.   
Q
Sale, Cheshire: Salford-born physicist and brewer, after whom the SI unit of energy is named, who died and was buried there

A
James Prescott Joule
7.   
Q
Westhoughton, Lancashire: star of The Sting and Jaws, born there in 1927

A
Robert Shaw
8.   
Q
Trowbridge, Wiltshire: inventor of the world’s most famous shorthand system, born there in 1813

A
Sir Isaac Pitman

Supplementaries

9.   
Q
Twickenham, London: father of the game that made the area famous

A
William Webb Ellis
10.   
Q
Morecambe, Lancashire: real name of the town’s most famous son, whose stage name paid homage

A
Eric Bartholomew
11.   
Q
Bromley, Kent: children’s author, whose most famous creation gave Dennis Waterman his first screen role; spent most of her adult life there

A
Richmal Crompton

Round Four: History

1.   
Q
Which British Prime Minister introduced the Great Reform Bill of 1832?

A
Earl Grey
2.   
Q
Who was Emperor of Japan from 1926 to 1989?

A
Hirohito
3.   
Q
Now in Gloucestershire, what was the second largest town in Roman Britain?

A
Cirencester (Corinium)
4.   
Q
Who commanded the ill-fated North West Passage expedition in the 1840s?

A
Lord (Sir John) Franklin
5.   
Q
Who was President of France, from 1974 to 1981 – after Pompidou, and before Mitterand?

A
Valery Giscard-d’Estaing (accept Giscard)
6.   
Q
What happened to Sir John Trevor MP, in 1695, that got him many name-checks in May and June this year?

A
He was the last Speaker, before Michael Martin, to be forced out of office
7.   
Q
Which English general’s greatest victory was at the battle of Blenheim?

A
John Churchill, Duke of Marlborough (accept either)
8.   
Q
Which dukedom, generally given to the second son of the King or Queen, did both George V and George VI hold before they came to the throne?

A
Duke of York

Supplementaries

9.   
Q
Who led the Zulus in the Anglo-Zulu war of 1879?

A
Cetshwayo (Cetewayo)
10.               
Q
Who did Elizabeth II overtake last year, to become the third longest reigning British monarch ever (after Victoria and George III)?

A

Henry III (she’s due to overtake George III in 2011, and Victoria in 2015)

Round Five: World Heritage

Note to question persons: this is a visual round.  Before starting, please ask if any of the contestants is or are visually impaired; if anyone is, offer them (when it comes to their turn) one of the alternatives below.
You should have two copies of each picture.  Hand out one copy to each team simultaneously, one question at a time.  The pictures are in reverse order, so you can put them down face down and tear them off from the back.
Now please read the following paragraph out to the contestants!
UNESCO World Heritage Sites are places that UNESCO considers to be of outstanding cultural or natural importance to the common heritage of humanity.  In this round you’ll be shown a picture of one of them; you just have to say what country it's in.

The pictures can be seen by clicking here
1.       
Cambodia (Angkor Wat)
2.       
Tanzania (Kilimanjaro)
3.       
USA (Grand Canyon)
4.       
China (Terracotta Army)
5.       
Egypt (Abu Simbel temple)
6.       
Peru (Machu Picchu)
7.       
Spain (Alhambra, Granada)
8.       
Italy (Venice)

Supplementaries

1.       
Mexico (Chichen Itza)
2.       
Turkey (Blue Mosque, Istanbul)
3.       
Australia (Uluru, a.k.a. Ayers Rock)

Alternatives (for visually impaired contestants)

Two more UNESCO World Heritage sites:
1.   
Q
In which country is Lake Baikal, the world’s deepest lake?

A
Russia
2.   
Q
In which country is the ancient city of Petra?

A
Jordan

Round Six: Science – In the Kitchen

If you need any explanation for this round, see Question 7 …
1.   
Q
Which gas, produced during the fermentation of yeast, causes bread to rise?

A
Carbon dioxide
2.   
Q
In cooking, what name is given to a mixture of sodium bicarbonate and cream of tartar?

A

Baking powder

3.   
Q
Which vitamin, found in leafy vegetables, is essential for blood clotting?

A
Vitamin K
4.   
Q
How is albumen better known?

A
Egg white
5.   
Q
What is the name of the yellow food additive E102, which is thought to contribute towards hyperactivity in children?

A
Tartrazine
6.   
Q
Which polymer, present in ripe fruits, is essential for the setting of jam?

A
Pectin
7.   
Q
Which chef, whose style has been called ‘molecular gastronomy’, said: “All cooks are scientists … a cook could be called a practical physicist”.

A
Heston Blumenthal
8.   
Q
What is defined as the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of one gram of water by one degree Celsius?

A
A calorie (note: what we commonly refer to as calories, are really kilocalories)

Supplementaries

9.   
Q
What name is given to the process of oxidation and browning of sugar by heating it to around 170°C?

A
Caramelisation
10.   
Q
Adzuki, pinto and lima are types of which vegetable?

A

Beans





Round Seven: Sport

1.   
Q
Rashid Ramzi was recently stripped of his Olympic 1500 metres title after testing positive for doping.  He was the first Olympic champion from which country?

A
Bahrain
2.   
Q
Who rode Sea the Stars to victory in this year’s Derby, 2,000 Guineas and Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe?

A
Michael Kinane
3.   
Q
Cricket: who recently broke Alec Stewart’s record for the most appearances for England in one-day internationals?

A
Paul Collingwood
4.   
Q
Who recently became the first Russian player to win tennis’s ATP World Tour Finals?

A
Nikolai Davydenko (he beat Roger Federer in the semi-finals and Juan Martin del Potro in the final, last weekend)
5.   
Q
Which golfing great lost the play-off in this year’s Open Championship, after leading for most of the tournament?

A
Tom Watson
6.   
Q
Who scored his 100th Premiership goal last Saturday, on the day before his 36th birthday?

A
Ryan Giggs
7.   
Q
Who scored the opening goal in this year’s FA Cup final – the fastest ever in this fixture?

A
Louis Saha
8.   
Q
Rugby Union: nicknamed The Pitbull, who is England’s most-capped hooker?

A
Brian Moore

Supplementaries

9.   
Q
Which British heavyweight boxer lost two world title fights, to Floyd Paterson in 1959 and Muhammad Ali in 1966 – losing the British and Commonwealth titles to Henry Cooper in the meantime?

A
Brian London
10.   
Q
With 26 letters and two spaces, which football club has the longest name in the English and Scottish leagues?

A
Inverness Caledonian Thistle (Wolverhampton Wanderers is 22 letters, Brighton and Hove Albion 21, West Bromwich Albion 18.  AFC Bournemouth is 14!)

Round Eight: What comes next?

You may have seen this on Never Mind the Buzzcocks.  We’ll give you a line from a famous pop song, and you have to give the next line.
If you need clarification, we’ll tell you how many words we’re expecting.
Question persons: please don’t insist on the exact wording – as long as they’ve got the gist, that’s OK.  And please don’t be too strict on time.
1.   
Q
And in his pocket is a portrait of the Queen (8 words)

A
He likes to keep his fire engine clean (The Beatles – Penny Lane)
2.   
Q
All you did was wreck my bed (9 words)

A
And in the morning kick me in the head (Rod Stewart – Maggie May)
3.   
Q
And I’m on my knees, looking for the answer (7 words)

A
Are we human, or are we dancer? (The Killers – Human)
4.   
Q
The touch of your hand says you’ll catch me if ever I fall (10 words)

A
You say it best when you say nothing at all (Ronan Keating – originally Keith Whitley, also Alison Krauss)
5.   
Q
Backbeat, the word is on the street (8 words)

A
That the fire in your heart is out (Oasis – Wonderwall)
6.   
Q
They call me ‘her’, they call me Jane (4 words)

A
That’s not my name (Ting Tings)
7.   
Q
He never ever learned to read and write so well (10 words)

A
But he could play guitar just like ringin’ a bell (Chuck Berry – Johnny B. Goode)
8.   
Q
Got a rovin’ eye, and that is why she satisfies my soul (9 words)

A
Got the one and only walkin’, talkin’, livin’ doll (Cliff Richard)

Supplementaries

9.   
Q
The warden said, hey buddy, don’t you be no square (10 words)

A
If you can’t find a partner, use a wooden chair (Elvis Presley – Jailhouse Rock)
10.   
Q
The first mate he got drunk, broke in the captain’s trunk (8 or 9 words)

A
(The) constable had to come and take him away (Beach Boys – Sloop John B)
11.   
Q
When you were a young boy, did you have a puppy that always followed you around? (8 to 10 words)

A
Well I’m gonna be as faithful as that puppy (Ike & Tina Turner – River Deep, Mountain High)


General Knowledge

1.       
Q
Which French painter worked as a customs official, giving him the nickname “Le Douanier” (doo-ANNIE-ay)?

A
Henri Rousseau
2.       
Q
Which Socialist movement, founded in London in 1884, counts George Bernard Shaw, H. G. Wells and Virginia Woolf among its former members?

A
The Fabian Society
3.       
Q
What was the surname of the original “Tommy”, used on specimen forms in the British Army?

A

Atkins

4.     
Q
Whose first novel was Behind the Scenes at the Museum, more recent works including the crime novels Case Histories and One Good Turn?

A
Kate Atkinson
5.       
Q
Who is the current Vice President of the United States?

A
Joe Biden (last checked Monday 30th November)
6.       
Q
What word can mean (among other things) a type of boat, a way of kicking a ball, or the dimple in the bottom of a wine bottle?

A
Punt
7.     
Q
What’s the title of the musical based on the story of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons, which opened on Broadway in 2005 and in London in 2008?

A
Jersey Boys
8.     
Q
Which group of wading birds includes species called golden, grey, Kentish and ringed?

A
The plovers
9.     
Q
What’s the largest island in the Philippines?

A
Luzon
10. 
Q
In David Hockney’s painting Mr. & Mrs. Clarke and Percy, who or what is Percy?

A
A cat
11.   
Q
Which political pressure group, founded in the early 1960s, was dubbed by Harold Wilson “Guardian of the Tory Conscience”?

A

The Monday Club

12.   
Q
Which house in Grasmere, Cumbria, was home to William Wordsworth and his sister Dorothy from 1799 to 1808?

A

Dove Cottage

13. 
Q
According to Coleridge’s poem, where did Kubla Khan decree his stately pleasuredome?

A
At Xanadu
14.   
Q
Who was re-elected as Prime Minister of Israel earlier this year?

A

Binyamin Netanyahu

15.   
Q
Which colour, defined as purplish-brown or reddish-brown, has a name that’s French for a flea?

A
Puce
16. 
Q
Of which pop group is Limahl the lead singer?

A
Kajagoogoo (apparently they’re still touring …)
17.   
Q
What is Britain’s smallest native bird?

A
The goldcrest
18. 
Q
What’s the largest island in the Indian Ocean?

A
Madagascar
19.   
Q
In the Peanuts cartoons, what was the name of Snoopy’s feathered friend?

A

Woodstock

20.   
Q
Which famous TV personality was born in 1944 in East Finchley underground station?

A
Jerry Springer
21.   
Q
What name is (or has been) used for landmarks in New York’s Central Park, Paris’s Place de la Concorde, and London’s Embankment?

A

Cleopatra’s Needle (the one in Paris was the first to be taken out of Egypt, and the first to acquire this nickname; nowadays it’s usually known by the more formal name “the Luxor Obelisk”

22.   
Q
Which phrase was coined by Shakespeare, when Cleopatra referred to the time when she was “green in judgement, cold in blood”?

A
Salad days
23. 
Q
Which King of England was the father of Richard I and King John?

A
Henry II
24.   
Q
What name is given to the small ceremonial mallet used by an auctioneer, or (in the USA) a judge?

A

A gavel

25. 
Q
Which song by Aerosmith was a hit in 1986 for Run-DMC, its lyrics being inspired by an old music hall joke?

A
Walk this way (“if I could walk that way, I wouldn’t need the talcum powder …” – Aerosmith reportedly wrote the song after seeing a version of the joke in the Mel Brooks film Young Frankenstein)
26. 
Q
What nationality is the boxer Manny Pacquiao (pak-YOW), who knocked out Ricky Hatton in May this year and has since become the first boxer ever to hold world titles at seven different weights?

A
Filipino
27.   
Q
Which mountain was provisionally named Peak XV (fifteen) in 1849?

A
Mount Everest
28. 
Q
Which two puppet characters, who first appeared on BBC television in 1957, were created by the Czechoslovakian immigrants Jan and Vlasta Dalibor?

A
Pinky and Perky
29.   
Q
Which radio presenter was born David Patrick Griffin, in Buxton, on the 25th of May 1945?

A

Dave Lee Travis

30.   
Q
Which company, founded in Lancashire in 1895, shot to fame in the 1980s with its Freestyle athletic shoe?

A

Reebok

31. 
Q
Which three words complete this line spoken by Hotspur in Shakespeare’s Henry IV Part I: “Tell the truth and …”?

A

Shame the devil

32.   
Q
Who was elected in June to succeed Michael Martin as Speaker of the House of Commons?

A
John Bercow
33.   
Q
Which fortified wine can be Ruby or Tawny?

A

Port

34.   
Q
In ancient Rome, how were the six holy priestesses of the goddess of the hearth collectively known?

A
They were the Vestal Virgins
35. 
Q
Which county cricket club’s one-day team is known as the Brown Caps?

A
Surrey
36.   
Q
In which country is K2, the world’s second highest mountain?

A
Pakistan
37. 
Q
Commissioner Gordon is an important ally of which fictional crime-fighter?

A

Batman

38.   
Q
Which recently defunct duo had the surnames Hodges and Peacock?

A

Chas and Dave

39.   
Q
What name is given to a cross between a greyhound and a collie?

A

Lurcher (a lurcher is actually a cross between any “sighthound” and any “pastoral dog”)

40. 
Q
Which composer’s most famous works include On Hearing the First Cuckoo in Spring and The Walk to the Paradise Garden?

A
Frederick Delius
41. 
Q
What is the home state of the Kennedy family, which Ted Kennedy served as Senator from 1962 until his death in May this year?

A
Massachusetts (he was the third longest-serving US senator in history)
42.   
Q
What is kept on a stillage?

A

A barrel (of beer or ale, for example)

43.   
Q
Who became rich and famous by taking his Reggae Reggae Sauce to the Dragons’ Den?

A

Levi Roots (real name Keith Valentine Graham)

44. 
Q
Which will be the lowest-ranked country at the 2010 FIFA World Cup finals tournament next year – appearing for the first time since 1966?

A
North Korea
45. 
Q
Which range of mountains stretches from Alabama to Quebec, and reaches its highest point in Mount Mitchell?

A
The Appalachians
46. 
Q
In which 1978 film did Sha Na Na, stars of Woodstock festival in 1969, appear as Johnny Casino and the Gamblers?

A
Grease
47.   
Q
Which village in County Durham has given its name to the North of England Open Air Museum?

A

Beamish (the stout of the same name is brewed in Cork, Ireland by Beamish and Crawford plc)

48.   
Q
In France, what is La Bourse?

A

The stock exchange

49. 
Q
Who composed the Crown Imperial march for the coronation of King George VI?

A
William Walton
50. 
Q
In the human body, what are the cuspids?

A
Teeth (it’s another name for the canines, dog teeth or eye teeth; the premolars are sometimes known as the bicuspids)
51.   
Q
What is distinctive about a pizza calzone (cal-zoni)?

A
It’s folded over
52. 
Q
In which TV series did one of the main characters have a pet alligator called Elvis?

A
Miami Vice
53. 
Q
Which country will Tottenham’s Wilson Palacios and Wigan’s Maynor Figueroa be hoping to represent at the 2010 FIFA World Cup?

A

Honduras

54.   
Q
Name one of the two South American countries that don’t have a border with Brazil.

A

Chile or Ecuador

55. 
Q
In the film Slumdog Millionaire, which famous adventure story features in the final (twenty million rupee) question?

A
The Three Musketeers (the question was, which of these is one of the Three Musketeers; the options were Aramis, d’Artagnan, and two others we can’t remember)
56. 
Q
Which type of bear is named after the USA’s second largest island?

A
The Kodiak bear
57.   
Q
In heraldry, which type of creature is known as an urcheon (urchin)?

A

The hedgehog

58.   
Q
Which popular opera has a title that translates into English as “The Bat”?

A

Die Fledermaus

59. 
Q
Which planet’s two largest moons are Triton and Nereid?

A
Neptune
60.   
Q
Which herb is used to flavour the Italian sauce known as pesto?

A

Basil

61. 
Q
In which TV series did Edward Woodward, now recently deceased, play former secret agent Robert McCall?

A
The Equalizer
62. 
Q
Who pipped Lewis Hamilton to the Formula One drivers’ championship in 2007?

A
Kimi Raikkonen
63. 
Q
What’s the most populous city in China?

A

Shanghai

64. 
Q
Who won the Best Supporting Actor Oscar in 1997 for his role in Good Will Hunting?

A
Robin Williams
65.   
Q
In which American city is the district known as Haight-Ashbury?

A

San Francisco (named after two streets that meet there, it was the epicentre of the Beat and Hippie cultures of the 1950s and 60s)

66.   
Q
What is the least-used of Switzerland’s four official languages – after French, German and Italian?

A

Romansh

67. 
Q
Which one-act opera by Pietro Mascagni is often performed (and recorded) alongside Leoncavallo’s Pagliacci?

A
Cavalleria Rusticana
68. 
Q
What has a nucleus, a coma and a tail?

A
A comet
69.   
Q
In Greek mythology, who descended into Hades to retrieve his wife Eurydice (you-RID-isee)?

A

Orpheus

70.   
Q
Who was appointed as Gordon Brown’s “Enterprise Champion” in June this year?

A
Lord Sugar (formerly known as (Sir) Alan Sugar)
71.   
Q
What does Sir Alan’s TV programme The Apprentice have in common with Sunderland football club, and the rock band Muse?

A
They all use Montagues and Capulets (a.k.a. Dance of the Knights) from Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet, as their theme tune – accept any answer that says they all use the same tune
72.   
Q
Atlantic City, the original setting for Monopoly, is a coastal resort in which US state?

A
New Jersey
73.   
Q
Who played the title role in the 1963 film of Henry Fielding’s novel Tom Jones?

A
Albert Finney
74. 
Q
Which England rugby star replaced John Fashanu as a presenter in the last three main series of ITV’s Gladiators?

A

Jeremy Guscott

75.   
Q
Pakistan has two official languages.  English is one; what’s the other?

A

Urdu

76.   
Q
Who was the resident organist at the Blackpool Tower Ballroom, from 1930 until 1970?

A

Reginald Dixon

77.   
Q
Which animal is involved in a famous thought experiment devised in 1935 by the Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger?

A
A cat (the problem is known as “Schrödinger’s cat” – the point being that the cat might be alive or dead, depending on an earlier random event)
78.   
Q
Who was the Roman equivalent of Hades, the Greek god of the Underworld?

A

Pluto

79. 
Q
America’s Fred Lorz finished first in the 1904 Olympic marathon, but was disqualified … why?

A
He admitted that he took a lift for 11 miles of the route in his manager’s motor car – the Amateur Athletic Union eventually accepted his explanation that he only finished the race “as a joke”
80.   
Q
Which racecourse is situated on the Holker Estate in Cumbria?

A
Cartmel
81.   
Q
Which sporting personality endorses Kellogg’s Bran Flakes, on the TV adverts and on the back of the box?

A
Chris Hoy
82. 
Q
Who starred as the Mexican bandit leader, Calvera, in The Magnificent Seven?

A
Eli Wallach
83. 
Q
What name did Octavian take, after he succeeded his great uncle Julius Caesar as Emperor of Rome?

A
Augustus Caesar
84.   
Q
In Australia, what’s a Brumby?

A

A wild horse

85. 
Q
What was the Beatles’ second single, and the title track on their first album?

A
Please please me
86.   
Q
Which Russian chemist devised the periodic table of the elements?

A
Dmitri Mendeleyev
87.   
Q
Which European capital city is known as the City of Light?

A

Paris

88.   
Q
Which football club, currently playing in the Barclays Premier League, has Sir Harry Lauder’s song Keep right on to the end of the road as its “anthem”?

A

Birmingham City

89. 
Q
In which sport do contestants aim stones at “the house”?

A
Curling
90.   
Q
Who advertised Minced Morsels with a bloodhound called Henry?

A

Clement Freud

91. 
Q
Whose latest, controversial best-selling novel is entitled Paths of Glory, and subtitled A novel about Mallory of Everest?

A
Jeffrey Archer (the controversy is that it suggests that Mallory reached the summit of Everest, which some claim is an insult to Sir Edmund Hillary)
92. 
Q
Who was the third son of King Edward III, the father of Henry IV, and the first Duke of Lancaster?

A
John of Gaunt
93.   
Q
In the USA, if someone asked for your John Hancock, what would you do?

A

What you probably should do is sign your name (it’s slang for a signature – after the most prominent one on the Declaration of Independence)

94. 
Q
Which girl group of the 1990s was Louise Nurding (now known as Louise Redknapp) a member of?

A
Eternal
95.   
Q
Which North American rodent is also known as the woodchuck or whistle-pig?

A

The groundhog

96.   
Q
Which US state capital is nicknamed the Mile High City?

A

Denver

Supplementaries

97. 
Q
Which 2008 film starred Kate Winslet and Leonardo di Caprio as a young married couple living in an affluent suburb of New York?

A
Revolutionary Road
98. 
Q
Who wrote the novels Steppenwolf, Siddhartha, and The Glass Bead Game?

A
Hermann Hesse
99. 
Q
Who was the principal scriptwriter of Morecambe & Wise’s BBC shows?

A
Eddie Braben
100.           
Q
What’s the only African country that has both Mediterranean and Atlantic coastlines?

A
Morocco
101.           
Q
Which rare isotope of hydrogen is sometimes called heavy hydrogen?

A
Deuterium
102.           
Q
Which sporting organisation was formed in 1863 at the Freemasons’ Tavern, Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London?

A
The Football Association (FA)
103.           
Q
What was accidentally broken in 1952 by a group of Scottish students?

A

The Stone of Scone (Stone of Destiny is equally acceptable)